How a Staffing Agency Can Get You a Job Faster Than You Could on Your Own

For instance, many job seekers avoid partnering with a staffing firm because they mistakenly believe that these agencies are strictly for those who want temporary work. They also don’t work with them because they think they must pay to work with a recruiter.

Misconceptions can hurt your efforts to find a job quickly.

For instance, many job seekers avoid partnering with a staffing firm because they mistakenly believe that these agencies are strictly for those who want temporary work. They also don’t work with them because they think they must pay to work with a recruiter.

These two perceptions are not true for all staffing agencies, so those people who hold on to these ideas could be missing out on an opportunity to enhance their chances of landing a dream job.

Finding the right job can be an overwhelming process, so it makes sense to take advantage of every available resource. And if you aren’t even considering partnering with a staffing agency, you’re missing out on a valuable resource. Here’s why:

Your Job Search Will be More Efficient

Searching for a job can be unnerving. Trying to find the right open jobs, researching potential employers, and setting up interviews can take up large chunks of your time. When you partner with a staffing agency, you’ll streamline the process and give focus and direction to your search.

You’ll Be Working With an Experienced Recruiter

Skilled recruiters ask the right questions:

  • What are your career goals?
  • What type of work environment are you seeking?
  • Would you prefer the flexibility of contract work?
  • What would you like to see in a future job that you don’t have now?

Armed with the answers, your recruiter can narrow the search and home in on the jobs that fit your criteria. They cut through all those job titles, confusing job descriptions, and postings and provide you with only those that make sense for you.

You Immediately Have Access to Numerous Employers and Jobs

Staffing agencies have hundreds, even thousands, of clients who are looking for workers just like you. The recruiters are continuously communicating with those who have the authority to hire you, and they take on the role of liaison between you and the hiring company. Because of the agency’s relationships, you will see job openings that are not available through the usual job sites. And your partnership with a staffing firm will allow you to have many more options than if you were searching on your own.

You Will Have Help Scheduling Interviews and Update Your Resume

Your recruiter will coordinate your interviews and assist you in preparing for them. Also, they will recommend ways to edit your resume so that it is tailored for the company to which you are applying. After you have been hired, your recruiter will follow up and stay in touch with you to make sure things are going well in your new position.

Find Your Next Job with Outsource!

We can help you with that! Contact the experts at Outsource. We are the largest staffing firm in the nation specializing in the placement of low voltage and electrical talent.

Discover The Power of Real Partnership

Let's talk about the world of possibilities and how we can partner to make them a reality.

Our Latest Resources

What's new in the world of work? Check out the latest highlights, including staffing trends, top insights and more.

Outsource News
Maneuvering Your Job Search Through a Pandemic

A global pandemic means times are uncertain, stressful and even a bit frightening. While the COVID-19 outbreak has not only caused a health crisis it has also caused an economic crisis as well...

Outsource News
Be Ready to Answer These Questions at Your Next Job Interview

Whether this is your first job interview or you've done several already, you will probably find yourself with a case of nerves as it begins...

Outsource News
How Much Will It Cost to Become an Electrician?

Are you considering becoming an electrician? If so, you’ll want to think about the return you can expect on the investment you will make in education and training...

What to Expect with a Cable Technician Position

Cable technicians are responsible for installing, maintaining, troubleshooting, and repairing a variety of residential and commercial voice and data cables. They could be servicing feeder lines that deliver cable access to several homes or working with drop lines that allow access for only one home.

You’re thinking about a career as a cable technician, but you would like to know more about what the job entails. Well, if you’re already leaning in that direction, here are a few essential facts that should help to confirm your decision:

  • Even though cable television and internet equipment have already been installed in most major residential areas, job growth for line installers and repairers, which includes cable technicians, is expected to be at 8% from 2016-2026, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • The median annual wage for cable installers was $38,780 as of March 2019.
  • Some of the skills needed to become a cable technician will help to prepare you for jobs in other areas.

Now that you know some of the advantages of the career, this should lead to your next question:

What do cable technicians do?

Cable technicians are responsible for installing, maintaining, troubleshooting, and repairing a variety of residential and commercial voice and data cables. They could be servicing feeder lines that deliver cable access to several homes or working with drop lines that allow access for only one home.

Cable technicians in the advanced stages of their career often work on trunk lines, which are the main lines for an entire service area. Other duties for cable technicians might include laying ground cable, inspecting cable lines, repairing poles and towers, and driving work vehicles to the various job sites.

What are the typical requirements and qualifications for the position?

Cable technicians should have a high level of manual dexterity. A strong background in math and science is recommended. They need to be excellent communicators and should be able to solve most problems without supervision.

Here is a list of requirements from a recent job posting:

  • High school diploma or equivalent
  • Valid driver’s license with a clean driving history
  • Communication skills that allow for successful collaboration with other members of the team
  • Solid problem-solving capabilities
  • Commitment to abide by OSHA and all other safety standards and procedures
  • Ability to identify different colors and learn color codes
  • Ability to work at heights and lift 50+ pounds
  • Knowledge of industry-standard cable specifications
  • Organized, reliable, and driven

Please note: The ideal candidate will be passionate about providing high-quality service and excited by complex problems and challenges.

Does this look like your kind of job?

We would be happy to help you get started. Contact the experts at Outsource. We are the largest staffing firm in the nation specializing in the placement of low voltage and electrical talent.

Discover The Power of Real Partnership

Let's talk about the world of possibilities and how we can partner to make them a reality.

Our Latest Resources

What's new in the world of work? Check out the latest highlights, including staffing trends, top insights and more.

Outsource News
Maneuvering Your Job Search Through a Pandemic

A global pandemic means times are uncertain, stressful and even a bit frightening. While the COVID-19 outbreak has not only caused a health crisis it has also caused an economic crisis as well...

Outsource News
Be Ready to Answer These Questions at Your Next Job Interview

Whether this is your first job interview or you've done several already, you will probably find yourself with a case of nerves as it begins...

Outsource News
How Much Will It Cost to Become an Electrician?

Are you considering becoming an electrician? If so, you’ll want to think about the return you can expect on the investment you will make in education and training...

Why Is the OSHA-10 Training So Important?

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was founded in 1971, and during those 48 years, it has helped reduce workplace fatalities by 66%

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was founded in 1971, and during those 48 years, it has helped reduce workplace fatalities by 66%. Because of its training and safety requirements, it has been responsible for saving thousands of lives. 

Since construction workers have a fatality rate that’s larger than other industries, and since many skilled electrical workers end up in the construction industry, OSHA-10 training takes on added significance.

OSHA has identified four hazards in the construction industry that cause almost 80% of the worksite fatalities. They include the following hazards:

  • Falls: The deadliest of the dangers, falls account for 34% of all deaths.
  • Caught in or between: Caught-in or between injuries occur when a worker is squeezed, caught, crushed, compressed, or pinched between parts of an object or several objects.
  • Struck-by: This category includes all fatalities resulting from flying objects and those that move, fall, roll, and then strike a worker.
  • Electrocution:  Training for electrical hazards focuses on de-energizing circuits and then ensuring that no charge remains.

Why choose the OSHA 10 course?

Some business owners and managers initially question the effectiveness of a 10-hour course. Even though it’s short, the OSHA-10 program covers a variety of topics taught by industry experts and customized to fit your employees’ needs.

For example, if you send workers from the electrical industry, the instructors might focus on lockout/tagout training or provide instruction on arc flash prevention. The training has the added benefit of making your workers proactive in asking supervisors about safety practices before performing a hazardous task.

The OSHA 10-hour safety course helps workers identify, avoid, and correct on-the-job hazards. They learn to prevent electrical dangers they might not have known existed. The program is an affordable way toward a company culture of workplace safety.

What are some of the areas the training covers?

Of course, the training covers the four hazards that were touched upon earlier, including fall prevention, electrocution, struck-by, and caught-in, plus personal protective equipment, hazardous materials, electrical and chemical safety, and machine safety.

Because there is a reduction in workplace accidents from the OSHA-10 program, workers, businesses, and taxpayers save money.

The OSHA-10 certification is available through Outsource.

Are you looking to hire some quality workers this fall?

Give us a call, and we’ll work with you to find them. Contact the professionals at Outsource. We are the largest staffing firm in the nation specializing in the placement of low voltage and electrical talent.

Discover The Power of Real Partnership

Let's talk about the world of possibilities and how we can partner to make them a reality.

Our Latest Resources

What's new in the world of work? Check out the latest highlights, including staffing trends, top insights and more.

Outsource News
Maneuvering Your Job Search Through a Pandemic

A global pandemic means times are uncertain, stressful and even a bit frightening. While the COVID-19 outbreak has not only caused a health crisis it has also caused an economic crisis as well...

Outsource News
Be Ready to Answer These Questions at Your Next Job Interview

Whether this is your first job interview or you've done several already, you will probably find yourself with a case of nerves as it begins...

Outsource News
How Much Will It Cost to Become an Electrician?

Are you considering becoming an electrician? If so, you’ll want to think about the return you can expect on the investment you will make in education and training...

Build Your Skilled Trades Career with Structured Cable Training Courses

In case you weren’t aware, there are a variety of ways to make it into the electrical trade. One of the approaches that we here at Outsource recommend is through our Field Employee Training Program.

In case you weren’t aware, there are a variety of ways to make it into the electrical trade. One of the approaches that we here at Outsource recommend is through our Field Employee Training Program. The program has provided quality entry-level, low-voltage installers to our clients around the country. The introduction of this vigorous and well-designed program is done onsite at Outsource. The best news: you can complete it in a week at no charge to you!

There are two days devoted to obtaining your OSHA 10 certification. You will also get the tools, safety equipment, and skills to go out and work with our clients immediately. In addition to the OSHA 10 certification and the tools and equipment, you will learn the following:

  • Data jack termination: trainees will have terminated well over 100 voice and data jacks
  • Professionalism
  • Jobsite etiquette

Outsource employs over 2,000 technicians each week on job sites across the United States. We work with every national system integrator and all the major electrical contractors. It’s no wonder that many of our technicians continue to permanent positions. Our structured cabling course is an excellent entry point into the construction industry, and it provides a selection of options for choosing a career path. Outsource specializes in training those who are looking to transition into a skilled trade, and we offer it at no cost.

Read what Chris Trevino, the Field Operations Manager for the company, has to say about structured cabling as a viable career option:

The construction industry is always in need of new talent, and this has never been truer than it is today. The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently announced that it expects to add nearly 10 million new jobs to the U.S. economy through the year 2024. Many of those jobs will go to skilled trade technicians in the construction industry, and structured cabling is a great skill to have. As you gain experience and knowledge, you will be given more responsibility on the job and have the opportunity to transition into other areas of structured cable, including A/V and security installation.

Below are the primary goals for our unique training program:

  • We want to provide our clients with entry-level talent that they can cultivate and develop following their culture so they can attain their desired labor mix.
  • We are looking to give back to the community by providing valuable and free-of-charge training courses to those looking to learn a trade and start a career.
  • We are hoping to create career opportunities for aspiring trade workers by delivering hands-on training by qualified trainers in a single week timeframe.

If you have any questions about our training capabilities, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Steve Ebenhack
310.953.3039
steve@outsource.net

Discover The Power of Real Partnership

Let's talk about the world of possibilities and how we can partner to make them a reality.

Our Latest Resources

What's new in the world of work? Check out the latest highlights, including staffing trends, top insights and more.

Outsource News
Maneuvering Your Job Search Through a Pandemic

A global pandemic means times are uncertain, stressful and even a bit frightening. While the COVID-19 outbreak has not only caused a health crisis it has also caused an economic crisis as well...

Outsource News
Be Ready to Answer These Questions at Your Next Job Interview

Whether this is your first job interview or you've done several already, you will probably find yourself with a case of nerves as it begins...

Outsource News
How Much Will It Cost to Become an Electrician?

Are you considering becoming an electrician? If so, you’ll want to think about the return you can expect on the investment you will make in education and training...

A Bright Future: Outlook for Growth in Cabling and Electrical Jobs

you’ve ever thought about becoming an electrician, now would be the time to act on it.

If you’ve ever thought about becoming an electrician, now would be the time to act on it. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of electricians is projected to grow nine percent from 2016 to 2026. New construction and the growing demand for alternative energy sources will fuel much of the job growth.

Those electricians who can take on a variety of assignments–solar photovoltaic installation, industrial wiring, and electronic systems repairs—will have the most opportunities.

Solar and wind are just two of the emerging power industries that will be requiring more electricians to install and maintain them. As time goes on, electricians will be needed in higher numbers to connect these alternative power sources to both homes and power grids.

Here are a few factors to consider as you contemplate your future as an electrician:

Our infrastructure is aging

The electrical grid in the U.S. is growing old. It’s becoming unreliable and obsolete, which means there will be a need for many electricians and skilled linesmen to update our transmission and generation facilities. The process will be labor-intensive, and that is good news for future job prospects.

New industries are emerging

Alternative energy systems, with wind and solar leading the pack, will require highly-skilled workers to get them up and running and to link them to the existing electrical networks.

New technology installed in current systems

Automation and electronics will be added to existing systems in a variety of industries. Electrical workers will be needed to install, operate, and maintain this equipment, increasing the demand for electricians for the foreseeable future.

A general shortage of skilled labor

The demand for electrical workers is increasing because there is a shortage of skilled labor in every industry. One factor is that the so-called baby boomers have retired or are planning to leave the workforce shortly, which means a significant number of replacement workers will be required to fill the void.

Also, the 2008 financial crisis resulted in an economic decline that caused many employers to curb hiring and cut apprenticeship programs. Because of the combination of these two factors, there will be a substantial reduction in the number of skilled electricians at a time of increasing demand.

There are no quick-fixes

Skilled workers, such as electricians, must go through a rather lengthy training process in either a vocational education program or an extended apprenticeship period. Unlike unskilled entry-level labor, increasing the supply of electricians and other skilled workers cannot be accomplished in a short time. Vocational education programs and long apprenticeship periods mean that it takes time to increase the pool of qualified workers.

Many high schools have begun promoting skilled trades as an attractive alternative to a four-year college. And some community programs are now raising awareness of the benefits of a career as an electrician or in the other skilled trades.

Let Outsource help you find your next job in the electrical field!

The skills shortage provides an opportunity to find work as an electrician. Contact the experts at Outsource. We are the largest staffing firm in the nation specializing in the placement of low voltage and electrical talent.

Discover The Power of Real Partnership

Let's talk about the world of possibilities and how we can partner to make them a reality.

Our Latest Resources

What's new in the world of work? Check out the latest highlights, including staffing trends, top insights and more.

Outsource News
Maneuvering Your Job Search Through a Pandemic

A global pandemic means times are uncertain, stressful and even a bit frightening. While the COVID-19 outbreak has not only caused a health crisis it has also caused an economic crisis as well...

Outsource News
Be Ready to Answer These Questions at Your Next Job Interview

Whether this is your first job interview or you've done several already, you will probably find yourself with a case of nerves as it begins...

Outsource News
How Much Will It Cost to Become an Electrician?

Are you considering becoming an electrician? If so, you’ll want to think about the return you can expect on the investment you will make in education and training...